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Aug
06

Overcome Sports Injuries

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Coming back from an injury can be an extremely stressful, but it does not have to be! Let me tell you a story of how our training can help athletes bounce back from an injury.

Watch this unique way to overcome sports injuries

Nancy was a strong and aggressive volleyball player and loved the competition of big tournaments. She started playing at age 12 and her coaches knew right away that she was something special.

One night during a game, she dove for a save and injured her ankle. As she stood up she found she could not stand on her foot. With tears streaming down her face, she was helped off the court.

Having always been tough as nails, she thought she would be back within a few weeks, but as it turned out she missed the rest of the season.

Fear and doubt with a sports injury

As the reality of her situation sunk in, her spirits took a big dive. For the first time in her life, Nancy felt fear and doubt in the back of her mind constantly.

She had put a lot of stock in her identity as a top-notch volleyball player and having it literally disappear over night was shocking. She was frustrated she could not play and worried if she would even be able to “comeback” at all.

Parents, this is perfectly normal. At a time when most kids are struggling to get to know who they really are, playing sports fulfills multiple emotional needs. It’s how they fit in, develop their own self-efficacy and form their perception of worth as a person.

After months of painful rehab, Nancy was physically ready to play, but something was still holding her back. She knew the fear wasn’t rational, because she had completely healed. She was a gifted athlete and knew what she was supposed to do tactically, like the back of her hand.

But as she explained to her coach, she now had a fear that she just couldn’t shake and, in practice, her coach noticed the difference too.

Instead of brushing it off and “putting it out of her mind”, the first thing she worked on was her focus, or, her dominant thoughts. Hundreds of doubting thoughts over a period of time, starts to “condition” your mind so you have to reverse that before doing anything else.

She had her go back to the reasons why she started playing volleyball in the first place and come up with a mantra she could repeat over and over that corrected her focus.

The next step was to release all those stored up difficult emotions resulting from her injury and the setback to her career. Telling herself simply to just “let it go” would not cut it!

The work has to be done at a cellular level, where the emotions literally get stuck. This is why we use guided visualizations in our training and it worked wonders for her. She told me how light and free she felt afterwards.

She gradually began to “trust” her knee and body again and went on to a stellar season.
A year later, realizing her dream of playing college ball, she told me that the lessons she had learned from using her mind to come back in volleyball, helped her in bouncing back from a lost relationship.

Sports injuries and life

ALL athletes experience major difficulty, fears, doubts and setbacks in their sport. How they come through it all, OR NOT has far-reaching, lifelong effects on all aspects of their life.

Doubt, worry and fear don’t stay locked in the sports arena, they creep into all areas of our lives.

It is crucial to address these fears and setbacks as soon as possible, so they do not become lifelong issues that hold your athletes back in other areas of their life.

Craig Sigl is the creator of 6 mental game training programs for athletes sold in 28 countries. His newsletters go to over 18,000 athletes, parents and coaches worldwide. 

He has been featured on NBC TV’s “Evening Magazine” show, numerous radio shows and the Seattle P.I. newspaper for his work with youth athletes.

For more great tips and to receive free “The 10 Commandments For A Great Sports Parent” ebook and Free training for youth athletes to learn how to “Perform Under Pressure”…
Go to http://www.mentaltoughnesstrainer.com/

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When trauma happens, our brain and nervous system naturally takes our body into a reflexive protective pattern. It doesn’t have to take much, a simple fall or repeated falls if you engage in more rough and tumble activities such as soccer.

Does the brain and nervous system let us live with stiff, tight muscles?

When we bear our weight more on one side or one leg, we tend to stand a bit shifted. Even if we mouse more on one side, we can develop a habit of using our muscles more on one side of ourself and before we know it, those side muscles tend to be a bit stiffer & less flexible.

Some of us tend to be more laterally flexed. You’ll see this when a neck slightly bends more to one side or the spine has what we call scoliosis. Either the spine is off center, the hip can be elevated, we feel short waisted or we’ve been told we have a leg length discrepancy.

brain and nervous system 300x257 How to use the brain and nervous system to our advantageTo let go of our holding, habitual, protective patterns which are being programmed into the brain and nervous system can be accomplished with a little neurological rewiring which somatics exercises provide.

Change the brain and nervous system with the mind and body

Far more encompassing that just a body approach. With somatics we are dealing with both mind and body and the relationship of the sensory motor system.

Wherever we are compromised, we take alternate routes neurologically which may be less than optimal yet serve to move us around as well as we can. These states are temporary and can become more fixed. We forget the feel of what youthful movement was like. This state can last for years or repeat itself in cycles when we can not overcome a niggling injury or have something reoccur more often than we’d like.

If the pathways of the brain and nervous system are clear, the lines of communication facilitate better overall movement and comfort. Moving with less effort leads us to states of graceful movement we can achieve through our very own self-corrective living process using the brain and nervous system.

If we end up dragging ourself around or into ourself or stumble and have lost our youthful coordinated ways. We’re only moments away from restoring more graceful and balanced movements. The brain and nervous system are set up waiting for us to use it to more positive means.

As we age, certain concerns like balance or breaking a hip come up. An animal survives when it can move well. As the human animal we can survive without moving well yet our animals teach us the way back to getting on track through the act of pandiculation which we’ve known for some time can bring our muscles to rest.

A mindful pandiculation uses both the brain and nervous system to reset ourself. Somatics exercises are a system of differentiated pandiculations to enhance our mobility and restore natural flexibility. By paying attention and using our conscious awareness, we raise our game of moving well for life.

Brain and nervous system class

Through the conscious use of our sensory motor system, we can undo that which has been our undoing for some time.

By adding depth and dimensions to our movements opens our proprioceptive ability. We can sense our joint position and self-adjust to more positive feelings. The brain and nervous system are effectively used.

Whereas other approaches focus on the body, we can use what the brain and body are exhibiting to use that information towards self-mastery and understanding our inherent nature to move well using the brain and nervous system.

Our very own keen senses can lead us towards the comfort we seek and the very one we can maintain as we age.

Please join us for a very special online somatics exercise class where you can join us live or get the replay for future enjoyment of your brain and nervous system as well both the mind and body to recapture those childlike feelings of moving well for life.

subscribe How to use the brain and nervous system to our advantage

Jul
22

Body and Balance

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Your body and balance may seem elusive at times. Living with any number of compensations such as shoulders rolled inwards, discomforts in our chest or upper back, high stress levels, etc. can either throw us off track or continue to prevent us from reaching states of comfortable balance.

How can we restore our body and balance?

Listen to how our pain and discomforts can be our greatest teacher and what to do to overcome what gets in our way.

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Did you catch the somatics tips which will let us regain comfort in our body and balance?

Somatics tips for the body and balance

Here are some everyday useful tips when you engage in easy movements such as somatics exercises.

Move with the least effort

This often goes against many people’s idea of how to exercise, yet when we live in discomfort this naturally makes more sense. Even if we are active, we can pay attention to our movements by noticing our sense of effort rather than pushing with our efforts. This slight difference makes a big difference.

Breathe with your movement to restore your body and balance

Often times we’ll hold our breath unaware of how this is impacting our sense of effort or the actual effort taking place. By playing games with our breath we can feel the differences something so simple may make.

We move as a system not as a muscle

The big muscle, the brain… sends messages to the muscles and receives back information in our sensory-motor feeback loop. When we become aware of how intimately involved our sense and level of effort is involved, we can improve our overall body and balance.

Thoughts can affect our movement and impact our body and balance

As you do any exercise, think a thought while feeling what muscles contract in your body. Or play with an emotion and feel that as you move. Again, what are you muscles doing? To what degree can you sense muscles turning on or off?

Comfort is king

Any small adjustment such as using a pad or pillow can alleviate any struggle we might find ourself when it comes to positioning ourself for a movement done on the ground. Even the slight adjustment of an angle may be the necessary thing to do so our body can be as comfortable at that moment we experience ourself in movement.

An exercise can’t hurt us

If we do get in a pickle and we try to force our body, it will naturally react and pull itself back – and that might hurt. To learn how to navigate our internal terrain successfully is what is key so that “if” we bump into discomfort during any exercise or exertion, we can use that information to bring our body and balance back as quickly as possible. More often than not, our compensations and habits of movement get us to bump that pain switch on – even to the point of it becoming chronic. Ouch! In difficult times, use your ability to imagine the movement and it’s highly likely you won’t hurt yourself.

Pain is our greatest teacher and gives us back our body and balance

In the practice of somatics exercises, we learn how to wield pain and discomfort to our advantage. Pain is merely a signal so that with a little practice, we begin to notch down the negative experience towards more comfort and pleasure.

Somatics Body and Balance Class

Would you like to feel how you can release the upper body and play with some lower body balancing?

You can join me online as we get ready for the Olympics in our Upper Body and Balance online class. You can join us live or get the replay.

You can do this as all you have to do is listen, follow along and feel how your body and balance will return comfortably with easy somatics exercises. The simple movement patterns we’ll play with may boggle the mind, but not the body.

We can restore our body and balance when we use the brain’s motor cortex and sensory-motor feedback loop in delightful, novel ways so please join us live or sign up to get the replay now.

Jul
17

Bare foot running

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When it comes to bare foot running, the Tarahumara have this unique human ability down pat. Is it possible that we could develop this same capability? Certainly they aren’t the only humans who use their body as it is designed.

Watch this video on bare foot running

Can you imagine what it is like to put your hands in glove liners and then wear gloves all day… and then use them?

This is what we are doing to our feet by wearing sock and shoes and not using them in the same way we use our hands and fingers. The ramifications of course move upwards into our knees, hips and spine and even our neck.

Aspire to bare foot running

Now to take our modern body which has become accustomed to socks and shoes and then radically make this shift will be like most things. We’ll have to learn to adapt or in this case, re-adapt to a more natural use of ourself.

Given that many people in modern day society live with any number of postural compensations, like an elevated hip, flexed or extended spine, etc. These type of compensations can continue even if we shift to bare foot running. We might still live with our discomforts yet we can change towards a comfortable use of ourself.

This is why shoe makers such as Vibram Five Fingers have a warning label on the time it may take to adapt to a different way of walking or running about.

Awhile back I made a video on somatics shoes. The first experience I had using a so-called bare foot running shoe. Well I wanted to do was jump up and down and relish in the delight in the lightness of the feet and the ability to sense the ground more acutely.

Bare foot running a proprioceptive experience

When we sense ourself with our proprioceptive ability. We can sense and feel the position of our joints with more awareness. This is what we’ve lost with our sock and shoe modern way.

By playing in the field of gravity, for instance with bare foot running, we can recover our lost healthy ways.

For some us though, we may need to de-compensate our postures and regain our natural ability of comfortable movement. Naturally, somatics exercises are here to remind us of how we can use our brain’s ability to reset muscle tension. We remember how to feel and adjust ourself back to comfortable levels so that if we decide bare foot running is something we want to try.

The transition becomes easy since we’re already playing with gravity and reacquainting ourself of our inherent proprioceptive abilities which have gone dormant.

Why not give bare foot running a try and feel if there is any difference in how you run or even walk.

Jun
19

Stop with all the Trauma

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When we fall, our muscles go into certain protective trauma postures. We’ll go back inside of ourselves and stay there for some time until the trauma usually resolves itself. Sometimes it takes a little longer.

Can you release physical trauma?

What if we could use what nature has given us to release the protective holding of a physical trauma more quickly and confidently.

Releasing held trauma is something I know about since I realized I had been holding onto an incident which occurred while I was a young boy. Some 30 years of holding a pattern unconsciously kept me at bay – and I didn’t even know it. Until one day, I did a very specific maneuver and I was reminded of the event that I had long since forgotten yet recalled more from a conceptual level.

So here I was reliving it and at the same time “finally” letting go of it. The trauma which was held, let go. Sometimes we hold onto things more than necessary. Yikes.

kneesknock 230x300 Stop with all the TraumaCompensations such as legs which are internally rotated can be a bear to live with, though in time we can get used to moving ourself around even if we’re hung up a bit, too stiff or get used to living with too much tension.

Heck we might have even created such a held trauma pattern by having read mystery or suspense books for too long with our knees knocking. Maybe those scary mystery books led us into another type of mystery such as scoliosis, which we can’t resolve.

Scoliosis and Trauma

Many people who have been diagnosed with scoliosis or suspect they have, often compensate with a fairly typical trauma response. While each of us displays this uniquely with certain vertebrate being pulled in one direction, another or in multiple distortions away from a neutral posture.

We can safely release held trauma tension patterns. After all, it has been happening to us on an ongoing basis. Our bones are not fixed as some would have you believe. If that were true, how come your still walking? Well maybe you’re still expertly limping around.

Held trauma patterns can cause us to limp too long so we favor another body part and compensate that around the trauma. We can get very good at navigating around, get used to it… until the pains of a lifetime keep knocking on the door again and again.

Trauma Release Class

Each week I teach people how the brain can let go of tension patterns, even if we’ve lived unconsciously with them like many of us have.

This week I’m offering an online class on a trauma release for the legs & hips which are more internally rotated. You can see that by looking at knees which roll inwards or a hip which is higher than the other one… or when we feel short waisted these types of compensations can let go when our brain’s motor cortex releases chemicals of relaxation so we regain both function and are more relaxed to move comfortably about.

You can get the class live or purchase a replay and enjoy it many times over. All you have to do is listen and follow along. No worries, you’ll be able to talk with me either live or in the replay portal where I’ll help you out.

Please don’t hold onto that physical trauma anymore, we can simply let it go and your brain is just sitting there waiting to make it happen now.

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May
20

Simple Differentiation

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When our back is a little out of whack, one of the keys to restoring comfortable movement lies in the simple differentiation of a very simple movement pattern.

Listen and follow along to this simple movement.

Somatics exercises are generally done in such a lazy, easy manner and surprisingly the rewards are better mobility, a return to natural flexibility and we feel renewed and more comfortable.

Simple differentiation to wake up both the brain and body

An easy movement such as the one in the audio recording is enough of a simple differentiation to wake-up the brain’s cerebrospinal fluid as we arise in the morning.

Healthy vertebrate animals wake-up their body and brain with simple movements which serves as their warm-up. Before we begin to exercise, we can do an easy simple differentiation or number of them varying the same theme, then we’re good to go like Fido.

If you’re in the unfortunate position of having to sit all day long for instance in the car, working and then sitting down to eat (unless of course you dare to stand up and eat for a change). No matter if you exercise, that may not be enough to change the known ill counter effects of sitting for too long.

Standing up is a simple differentiation which can help

You may have to plan on standing up every 20 minutes or so. You see, when you sit for too long, those muscles below the belt go to sleep and begin to be trained to be useless. No wonder we don’t walk as well or as much as we need since we’re basically training ourself to have muscles which no longer respond in a healthy manner.

Good news… just get up and stand, stand on one leg or walk around for a minute or so. Then you can sit back down. Even as I type a blog post such as this, I too am mindful of how sitting undermines us. This is why I often stand or kneel or sit in a different position, then change it and vary it afterwards.

If you’re gonna keep sitting, then at least fidget around or be mindful of how you can shift your spine around. All that tension we keep taking on, can be remedied with simple mindful movements to disperse, renew and refresh us.

By refreshing the spine, we can continually renew our muscles throughout the day, especially when they get amped up with too much tension. At the same time, we improve the function of the brain by taking a mind-body break or giving ourself a full-brainer of movement done with awareness.

A class on simple differentiation

After all life is movement and movement becomes easier when we can do a simple differentiation with the central part of ourself, our spine.

Renewing a simple way to move our spine, refreshes our movement system from the inside out. Practicing this periodically throughout the course of the day will let us rest easier at night so we can get a good night’s sleep and not wake up stiff or aching.

Please join me this week for a simple differentiation class which can make all the difference to having a comfortable spine for life. Refresh that spine so it can be renewed and you’ll feel regenerated. All it takes is a simple differentiation.

May
06

Foot Work

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Did you know that a little mindful foot work could help our troubled feet and knees? I’m not talking about fancy foot work either. More like what preceded our baby steps as we developed.

Do you have sensitive feet, the ones which don’t like to walk over stones or rocks. Ouch! I remember those days as a kid. Now past the half-century mark, I relish how supple good foot work feels.

Foot Work for All Ages

As children we did some very interesting foot work. We loved to pull on our toes. Little did we know we were in a very receptive state of learning and coordinating the little piggies so we could get to a market with our own feet.

These days many of us simply drive to the market and keep our poor painful feet wedged in shoes all day long. Can’t imagine how life would be if we were all to wear glove liners and mittens all day. What would happen to the function of our hands if we did the same?

What are we doing to our feet? That fleet foot work we used to have is a long distance memory as we have aged and bottled up those poor lowly feet.

Now we’re left with mangled toes, foot pain, orthotics, and the search for the right kind of shoe. While shoes have certainly advanced, did our foot work remain in the dust.

Do we really need an orthotic? Maybe we could do some foot work and remember to move well once again.

Foot Work, Handiwork is it the same?

Most likely you can still fold your hands. So try this. Lie on your back, and take your hands behind your head and interlace your fingers. Then once you’ve settled in, switch the position of your fingers and hold your hands the other way.

For some of you, that’ll be no problem and then for some us that could feel strange, awkward as if someone else is holding our hands.

Our habits which we groove in over time are necessary. We may forget small differences help us use our self a little bit differently so we don’t wear our self out as fast. Slight adjustments and little differences lets the brain thrive. It thrives on subtle differences to renew us.

As we readjust to a newness, we change both our body and brain. Now try doing the same with your toes. Yes, try and fold those toes together. Whadya mean you can’t reach down there anymore?

Maybe this is where some of you are now at. Others of you really had to work it to even get the toes to wedge together.

Awhile back I made a video on some foot work. Try this move if you haven’t given it a try. For those of you who did, did you keep working it so this type of foot work is now improved and easy.

That type of footwork can come in handy to change the function of the feet and even the knees so you can walk more comfortably.

Another Foot Work Class

Many times I’ve taught foot work movements to soccer players which had them laughing about how what appears simple isn’t as easy as thought. Though with a little practice, our movement system remembers to move and improve.

We can rekindle the feelings of childlike movement which felt good and free since we have a sensory-motor feedback loop which allows us to reset and readjust tension levels.

We can get back in this loop so our balance improves, our feet feel lighter and our knees can lose their aches simply through subtle readjustments to move us to higher levels of coordination and integration so we manage those formerly painful stones and rocks.

You can join me for an hour’s worth of foot work online, by phone, or even get the replay this Friday where you’ll learn to free up the feet, lower legs and knees so you can dance and move easily again.

In the meantime, just go ahead and pull those toes so your foot work doesn’t get left behind.

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    Apr
    29

    Exercises for Rotator Cuff

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    Rotator Cuff Exercises for Rotator Cuff 256x300 Exercises for Rotator CuffPains in the shoulder, stiffness, weakness and even pain while sleeping on the side can be lessened with a simple set of exercises for rotator cuff. Over time, the situation can become chronic or if you’ve had surgery, it may be necessary to keep the shoulder functional.

    The rotator cuff area allows us to both internally and externally rotate our shoulders while also letting us move the shoulder away, out and up to the side.

    A Different Set of Exercises for Rotator Cuff

    Normally both stretching and strengthening exercises are recommended by doctors, and orthopedists. Physical therapists will have you follow this protocol.

    They may want you stretch after doing a reach up the wall or have you strengthen in between the shoulders. While the idea is good, we can go about it in a more intelligent fashion and manner so that the muscles lose their restriction and regain their function.

    Instead of the heresy of stretching, we can pandiculate the tight, restrictive areas so those areas regain both both function and remain limber.

    Somatics exercises for rotator cuff, on the other hand, use the process of pandiculation to regain mobility and give us back our function so that we can comfortably move the shoulder area back and forth and up and out to the side in this case.

    A Diversity of Exercises for Rotator Cuff

    With a number of stretches and strengthening exercises for rotator cuff, you learn to hold things for a period of time or do numbers of repetitions.

    With somatics, we target the brain’s motor cortex. It can reset the muscles so they “remember” their function. This higher level of intelligence doesn’t require the physical strain that most people endure, instead we use our awareness of the quality of the movement. We can sense the connections we use when we move our shoulders about. This gives us a better range.

    Exercises target muscles where intelligent movement takes care of the movement system which includes more muscles since we are of one piece. One integrated movement system, rather than the parts, which allows for greater cohesion and more effortless movement in general.

    This gentler yet highly intelligent approach, gives us the ability to create more options to move despite the very ones we’ve guarded against or haven’t done on account of the binds holding things together.

    Exercises for Rotator Cuff Class

    A diversity of movement lets the brain thrive too. By going cortical, the brain creates more cells, it releases chemicals of relaxation, and we restore and recover naturally rather than forcing, straining or pushing our way through it.

    “Being” with our movement system is another tack or way to move more comfortably about. To be free and regain our strength is simple.

    You can join us in this week’s somatics class: Diversify Your Movement Portfolio – Exercises for Rotator Cuff. You may join us either online, by phone or get the replay.

    In the little over an hour class, you’ll learn a number of different ways and movement patterns to experience how simple somatics is and yet how much power you can have.

    The diversity found in the exercises for rotator cuff class will give you plenty of intelligent ammo to keep the shoulders and more, happy for life.

    Apr
    22

    Wall of Fame

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    I didn’t exactly make the Hall of Fame, yet I managed somehow to survive the nearly 20 years of fibromyalgia (chronic pain) and make the Wall of Fame at the University of Texas.

    The Wall of Fame houses the pictures of students who won various intramural sports competitions.

    Little did we know we were headed for the Wall of Fame

    Back in ’79, amidst the days of unrest of the Iran hostage crisis, the last 11 guys who didn’t make the soccer team formed an intramural team.

    We beat our fellow University of Texas club soccer team in the semis and played against a raucous crowd of Middle Eastern students in the finals. We had to go to a penalty shoot-out to win the coveted burnt orange t-shirt.

    University of Texas Wall of Fame T-shirt

    Wall of Fame Then and Now 300x228 Wall of FameThe celebration lead to my dorm room where there happened to be a very large bottle of spirits that we managed to finish off early in the morning. Somehow I made it through the 3 final exams the next day. Ah, to be young again.

    My playing days got interrupted with what at the time seemed to be mysterious chronic pains. Eventually, the diagnosis of fibromyalgia gave me something to wrap my mind around during that nearly 2 decade struggle.

    Fortunately I came out of it and learned very valuable lessons to pass onto others.

    The University recently sent a Wall of Fame t-shirt commemorating our efforts. In a box, I discovered I had the original t-shirt we won in ’79.

    Wall of Fame Moves

    In those days, I was taught to stretch. It was something I never liked to do even though I would go for nearly 2 hours per day during my bouts of chronic stiffness and pain. Fibromyalgia was a 24/7 event.

    Years later, I became a Hanna Somatic Educator and gave up my stretching ways and learned about the marvelous ways we can reset our muscles through the natural process of a pandiculation.

    This simple reset brings our muscles to rest, lets us lose our stiffness, decreases tension and by magic, releases our physical pain.

    There is really no magic about it. All it takes is 3 simple steps. Done with a gentle, easy conscious awareness. Our brain will reset muscles back to rest for comfortable movement.

    Please join me either by phone or online this week as I offer some Wall of Fame moves where you’ll learn to release the inner leg muscles (groin), chest, diaphragm, and waist.

    As we get older, we can move with greater ease. Life doesn’t have to be a struggle, at least this Wall of Fame individual knows it to be true and so can you.

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    Apr
    09

    Cool Somatics Move

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    Somatics is the reverse way to lengthen muscles. Instead of stretching, you can use the brain’s motor cortex to reset the muscles back to comfort.

    Here’s how somatics works

    You target the area you want to lengthen. You contract those those tissues by being mindful of what it is you are doing.

    With somatics you pay attention to how you release yourself. In some instances you can immediately notice if there is any physical change.

    stretching the back 150x150 Cool Somatics MoveAs an example, many people will bend over to lengthen their back.

    This could lead the back to bump the switch of the stretch reflex and get the muscles to reflexively pull back, even into a back spasm.

    Try the somatics movement below. This particular somatic movement can relieve the back and hamstrings of its excess tension.

    In less than 2 minutes feel what happens. You might want to listen through the first time and then replay it again.

    Otherwise, all you have to do is listen and follow along:


    Check out this somatics move


    Did you gain any length?

    Maybe you did, maybe you didn’t yet isn’t this a far different approach than stretching.

    When we voluntarily use our muscles, our brain’s cortex can reset the length of the areas we target. It’ll actually create chemicals of relaxation so we relax our self back to comfort.

    Somatics movement classes

    Each week we offer 45 minute to one hour online somatic movement classes where you use your brain to release the muscles.

    All you have to do is listen, follow along and let your muscles go along for a somatics journey which can give you the reverse way to feeling free once again.